Hop Profile
Centennial

Hop Profile: Centennial

The last hop we tackled was Cascade, the citrusy workhorse of the craft beer industry, but today we're focusing on Centennial: Cascade's bigger, more bitter, less flowery cousin. A highly versatile hop, Centennial's bitterness can stand up to most styles of beer while its aroma easily fills the noses of eagerly sipping beer drinkers with scents ranging from delicate to aggressive citrus hoppiness. Use more sparingly than Cascade unless you're looking to turn your pale ale up to 11.

  1. ORIGIN

    The Centennial Hops were first bred in 1974 as a cross between many different strains including Brewers Gold, Fuggle, East Kent Golding, and Bavarian hops. The name comes from the Washington State Centennial Celebration, which occurred in 1989, just before the public release of Centennial Hops in 1990.
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  3. CHARACTERISTICS

    Centennial Hops are a great dual-purpose hop and can be used successfully for both bittering and aroma. Centennial hops are very similar to Cascade and are characterized by aromatic pine, citrus, and floral notes.
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  5. VITAL STATS

    Typical Use : A good dual-purpose hop. Can be used for bitterness or to add flavor and aroma. Alpha Acid : 9-12% Country: United States Flavors: Rounded, Pine Needle, Tangerine Styles : Largely used in American pale ales and IPA's Similar Hops : Amarillo, Cascade, Columbus
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  7. BEERS TO TRY

    Smuttynose IPA Leatherlips IPA Founders Centennial IPA He'Brew Bittersweet Lenny's R.I.P.A.